#43: The Future of Digital Health Part 1

In Episode 43, Quinn & Brian discuss: The future of digital health.

Our guests are Dr. Indra Joshi & Maxine Mackintosh. Together, these two co-founded One HealthTech, a grassroots community that champions and promotes the unheard voices in health innovation to drive our future healthcare using technology. Dr. Joshi is also the clinical lead for NHS England's digital experience programme and Maxine is pursuing her PhD in neuroinformatics at the Alan Turing Institute, where she is working on the intersection of data science and dementia.

A lot of our episodes start off somewhere a little depressing, like our impending environmental collapse or the impending U.S. federal government collapse, or both, then we find a silver lining – but today’s episode starts with the silver lining! The future of digital health is looking pretty goddamn’ cool, female, and colorful (like most things should). It’s a big step up from our alabaster-ass present, that’s for sure.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#42: Almost An Astronaut

In Episode 42, Quinn & Brian ask: What happens when you’re almost an astronaut... and what comes next?

Our guest is Dr. Sian Proctor, an explorer, scientist, full-time professor, STEM communicator, and almost as astronaut. Today she joins the show to tell us how we can all help get more women and more people of color into space, one way or another. If you didn’t know – and we weren’t sure – being a white, male military pilot isn’t the only way to get to space! You can be exposed to radiation and get super powers, become an (evil?) genius who starts their own electric car and space flight companies, or become a college-educated engineer, biologist, physical scientist, computer scientist, or mathematician.

So we’re still out, but that’s still a pretty wide range of qualifications.

Dr. Proctor was so much fun to talk to and so inspirational, and this episode will serve as the booster shot you need to not give up on your dreams (even if your dream is to be the best antivaxxer out there because, like most vaccines, it’s completely safe for you and your children). It’s basically like watching The Greatest Showman over and over and over again, but in about an hour and with less singing.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#41: Outsmarting Cholera

In Episode 41, Quinn & Brian discuss: Outsmarting cholera.

Cholera is still around in many parts of the world, and not a lot has changed. That is to say, it’s still shitty and deadly. However, there is hope when it comes to treatment, and that hope is our guest Dr. Minmin Yen! Dr. Yen is the CEO and co-founder of medical startup PhagePro, where she and her team are developing bacteriophages, or viruses specifically designed to kill bacteria and prevent bacterial infections.

So why is this even necessary? Why can’t we just give people with cholera a pil? Well, antibiotics are fighting a losing battle against increasingly resistant bacteria and the 3-5 MILLION people who contract cholera every year need some help. The silver lining, luckily, is that the help they have is a heck of a lot smarter than us.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#40: What Takes a Young Woman from Art School to NASA... & Why Might That Change Everything Forever, for Everyone?

In Episode 40, Quinn & Brian ask: What would take a young woman from art school to NASA... and why might that change everything forever, for everyone, for good?


Our guest is Ariel Waldman, the author of What's It Like in Space? Stories from Astronauts Who've Been There, the founder of Spacehack.org, the global director of Science Hack Day (something she awesomely calls “massively multiplayer science”), and a member of the council for NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts – a program that nurtures radical, science fiction-inspired ideas that could transform future space missions.


Ariel is helping to build a great new future full of exciting ideas, and she does everything in her power to invite others to collaborate and contribute themselves. She’s doing all of the things, and while you don't have to do all of them too, Ariel is an inspiration for all of us to get out there and do SOMETHING! Plus, she is single handedly proving to parents everywhere that you can, in fact, do something with an art degree.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#39: Is The Ocean Running Out of Oxygen? Is That Bad?

In Episode 39, Quinn & Brian ask: Is The Ocean Running Out of Oxygen? Is That Bad?

Our guest is Dawn “Deepsea Dawn” Wright, Ph.D., the Chief Scientist of the Environmental Systems Research Institute (AKA Esri) and a Professor of Geography and Oceanography at Oregon State University. She also happens to have the distinction of being the first African-American woman to dive to the ocean floor in the deep submersible ALVIN (which we would totally be up for doing if anyone has a spare submergible chipmunk for us to ride).

Dr. Wright leads efforts to map the entirety of the ocean floor in, essentially, the same detail as the Google Maps app on your phone. This is one of the grandest endeavors that our society has yet to undertake, and it’s not just a good excuse to take a ride in a cool submarine. In many ways, we understand the stars and celestial bodies better than we understand the water that covers the majority of our planet – and we need to understand it if we’re going to protect it and prevent the depletion of oxygen.

P.S. If you like golden retriever puppies, you should definitely follow Dawn on Instagram.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#38: Is It Harder to Build Clean Power Plants or Play in a Reputable Cover Band?

In Episode 38, Quinn & Brian ask: Is it harder to build clean power plants or play in a reputable cover band?

Our guest is Sean Casten, a scientist, clean energy entrepreneur, and cover band member who is running for Congress in Illinois’ 6th district. Let’s let out a big “whoop whoop!” for Brian’s home district!

Sean is running against Peter “Skeletor” Roskam, who called climate change “junk science,” which is really all we need to hear to know that Sean is the right man for Illinois’’ 6th district. Plus, Sean is backed by our friends at 314 Action, an incredible group of people who are smarter than us trying to get other people who are smarter than us elected. You can check out our previous episodes with 314 Action founder Shaughnessy Naughton (episode 35) and fellow Congressional candidates Chrissy Houlahan (episode 37) and Joseph Kopser (episode 32) – and we’ll have even more STEM-ific candidates coming before the Midterm elections on Nov. 6th.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#37: Why Does Congress Need a Female Air Force Officer / Engineer / Chemistry Teacher / Mom?

In Episode 37, Quinn & Brian ask: Why does Congress need a female Air Force Officer / Engineer / Chemistry Teacher / Mom among its ranks? (Possibly our dumbest question yet?)

Our guest is Chrissy Houlahan, a candidate for Pennsylvania District 6 on Nov. 6th. We dig into the very personal reasons she’s running, what’s so special about Pennsylvania, and the first thing she’s going to do when she gets elected. Plus, how did she collect such an impressive list of bona fides?

Chrissy shares some incredibly insightful facts that highlight why this Pennsylvania race is so important – because, as it turns out, when you do your research, you get facts! (It’s one of the firsts time we’ve heard these from a politician, too, so don’t feel too embarrassed if it’s your first time hearing about this.) Chrissy is one of our featured conversations in partnership with 314 Action, an organization working hard to put STEM candidates in office. You can learn more about the organization in our interview with the founder, Shaughnessy Naughton, back in episode 35 and support them at 314action.org.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#25: Middle School Physics: Lame, or the First Step to Becoming A Superhero?

In Episode 25, Quinn & Brian ask: “Middle school physics class: Lame, or the first step to becoming a superhero?”

Our guest today is “The Physics Girl”, Dianna Cowern. She’s hunted for dark matter with MIT and Harvard, worked at GE, and is now one of the world’s most popular science communicators. And holy hell is her enthusiasm contagious.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#16: Clouds ruin EVERYTHING

In Episode 16, Quinn & Brian ask: what's the future of climate modeling? Also, what's a climate model?

Enter Dr. Kate Marvel. She's a climate scientist and a writer. A theoretical physicist by training, she is now an associate research scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University’s Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics. Because, sure.

Dr. Marvel's research focuses on how human activities affect the climate and what we can expect in the future, using satellite observations, computer models, and basic physics to study the human impact on variables from rainfall patterns to cloud cover.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#15: Can carbon capture be a building block in climate action, Part II?

In Episode 15, Quinn and Brian dig deeper and ask: Can carbon capture be a building block in climate action, part II?

On the mic: Akshat Rathi, a reporter for Quartz in London. He wrote a series last year called The Race to Zero Emissions about carbon capture, and we dig into that, and the next 10 years of CCS, today.

Akshat’s resume: he’s previously worked at The Economist and The Conversation. His writing has appeared in Nature, The Guardian and The Hindu. He has a PhD in chemistry from Oxford University and a BTech in chemical engineering from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai, and if that isn’t enough to convince you, well I’m sorry.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#14: How do we improve America’s agriculture system?

In Episode 14, Quinn (because Brian abandoned him) asks himself: How do we improve America’s agriculture system?

On the mic, Emily Cassidy, the Sustainability Science Manager at the illustrious and beautiful California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, and a leading member of their new climate action initiative, Planet Vision.

Emily's the co-author of a highly cited paper called “Solutions for a Cultivated Planet”, investigating how to sustainably feed 9 billion people. 

Today we put Emily’s long background in natural resources science to use and discuss the steps America, and Americans, need to take to improve our food system, and make it healthier. For the air, for the land, for the water, and for each of us, inside our bodies.

Also: Jane Goodall, and cow farts vs. cow burps.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#13: A blueprint for suing the pants off fossil fuel companies

In Episode 13, Quinn and Brian plot a blueprint for suing the pants off fossil fuel companies. Of course we don't know where the hell to start, so we asked for help.

Meet the mastermind: Mayor Serge Dedina of tiny Imperial Beach, California, one of the first cities to sue fossil fuel companies for climate change damages.

We discuss what led to their suit, but more importantly, actions other cities should be taking to plan for the future, including their own legal action. Also: surfing, Nazis, and grandmas.

Listen to the episode here, or read the transcript here.

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#10: The Tantrum That Saved The World

In Episode 10 (we made it!), Quinn & Brian read a picture book. And a damn good one. Introducing The Tantrum That Saved The World.

On the mic: Megan Herbert, Aussie co-author and illustrator of the popular new children’s book about climate change activism.

We talk about the book, her co-author, esteemed climate scientist and science communicator Michael E, Mann, as well as modeling behavior for our kids, providing them with tools now and in the future to become agents of change, and also drinking.

Order Megan and Michael’s book right now at WorldSavingBooks.com!

Listen here, or read the transcript here.

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#9: How do we stay safe from infectious disease (zombies)?

In Episode 9, Quinn and Brian cower under the desk and ask: How do we stay safe from infectious disease (zombies)?

Please meet Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, an infectious diseases physician, Assistant Professor at Boston University, and the Director of Infection Control and Medical Response at National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory. Yeah. Exactly what you imagine. That's her job. You're welcome.

We discuss historical pandemics, modern-day factors in the growth of new and return of old infectious diseases, our current level of preparedness, zombies, Minority Report, hand washing, and of course, anti-vaxxers.

Listen here, or read the transcript here.

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#8: How do we safeguard science in American schools?

In Episode 8, Quinn and Brian ask: How do we safeguard science in American schools?

Here to answer: Don Duggan-Haas, a lifetime advocate for science education standards (he literally wrote the textbook, and yes, this is the correct use of “literally”), as well as Therese Etokaand Jai Bansal, two immigrant high school students who fought to keep climate change science a part of the Boise, Idaho public school curriculum.

Together, we form a game plan to ensure every American student gets a comprehensive science education. 

Also: Black Panther, Shuri (swoon), the Justice League, James T. Kirk, thoughts on Parkland, and more.

Listen here, or read the transcript here.

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#7: How can we use the ocean without using it up?

In Episode 7, Brian and Quinn ask: How can we use the ocean without using it up?

Meet Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, marine biologist, policy expert, and conservation strategist extraordinaire. And like a hundred other things, because her hobbies include saving the planet, what about you, punk?

Find out how the ocean’s doing, who should be responsible for keeping it clean, how representation is a nightmare on ocean conservation boards just like everywhere else, and finally, the seafood you definitely should and should not be eating. 

Listen here, or read the transcript here.

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#6: The queer female volcanologist who wants to change Congress

In Episode 6, Quinn and Brian meet the queer female volcanologist who wants to change Congress.

Today's guest is the one and only Jess Phoenix, volcanologist, geologist, and Congressional candidate for CA-25. We discuss her experience in the field, her unlikely move into politics, and the lessons she’s learned as a female scientist that might help others to come.

Listen here, or read the transcript here.

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#2: Can this boat full of women save the world?

In Episode #2, Quinn introduces his co-host, Brian Colbert Kennedy, the mad genius (ugh) behind IMNIM’s infographic game. Together, they ask the question: Can this boat full of women save the world?

Join Quinn and Brian as they have a conversation with Dr. Heidi Steltzer and Anne Christianson, two female climate scientists who joined 74 others on a women-only trip to Antarctica. We catch them after their visit to Congress, and discuss ways to get more ladies involved in science, and finally, what all of us can do to support those efforts.

Listen here, or read the transcript here.

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